The post-Brexit liberalisation of #clinicaltrials could be the way to a bolder ambition for the UK

There is much post-Brexit talk of using our new-found political independence to liberalise clinical trials in the U.K. We can cut ourselves free of all that terrible EU red-tape that has weighed us down. Or so the argument goes. We can be quicker and more efficient than other countries. We will be more attractive to... Continue Reading →

Is it time to give patients the opportunity to self-refer themselves to take part in NHS research?

Harpal Kumar, the Chief Executive of Cancer Research UK, yesterday posted a blog about the new task force he is leading for NHS England on cancer diagnosis.  The aim of the task force is to enable people to get an earlier and speedier diagnosis of their tumour in the future.  But it will also be looking at treatment and... Continue Reading →

Big month in Brussels for clinical trials…but let’s not be hasty

It's going to be a 'big-ish' month in the EU for clinical trials. By most accounts, EU legislators will reach a compromise agreement on the proposed new Clinical Trials Regulation in time for Christmas.  The key focus for industry bodies is around making sure the legislation embraces aggressive timelines for the approval of clinical trials. Remind me, isn't... Continue Reading →

@RBandH Guest blog: Promoting Clinical Research Locally – From ‘OK to Ask’ to Research Changed my Life

Promoting Clinical Research Activities and Opportunities Locally – From OK to Ask to Research Changed my Life Mark Terry, Research Office, Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (m.terry@rbht.nhs.uk) 2013 has been notable for the strong momentum provided by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to NHS Trusts in our efforts to raise awareness of... Continue Reading →

Do I detect a slight fumble of the ball in today’s Commons Select Committee report on clinical trials?

Not for the first time I was awake at 3am this morning. Cup of tea in hand, watching American football.  It's amazing how those players keep the ball when so many other players are piling on top of them.  Rarely do you see the thing break free.  They must practice for hours.... The House of Commons... Continue Reading →

New websites launched for people looking to join a clinical trial; but will patients want a ‘coming together’ at some point?

This week, patients got a couple more options for finding out about clinical trials they can take part in. Patientslikeme (which was launched in the United States a few years ago) has unveiled its new new clinical trials site which you can find here.   Patientslikeme is capturing a lot of attention here in the UK... Continue Reading →

Charity right on Target with patient insights on clinical trials: where are the others?

This evening I have been reading a fascinating report about women with ovarian cancer and their access to clinical trials. Last week, Target Ovarian Cancer published the results of their 2012 Pathfinder Study.  It is an excellent piece of work.  What I like about it is that it digs around issues to do with choice... Continue Reading →

Testing, testing: please put Testing Treatments interactive through its paces

With the sort of timing which makes me wonder whether I missed my vocation as a TV scheduler it only seems right that, on the day the House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee has announced its inquiry into access to clinical trial data, I should ask you to road-test 'TestingTreatments interactive.' 'Testing Treatments interactive' is the... Continue Reading →

Current Controlled Trials (CCT) appoints new advisory board

Current Controlled Trials (CCT), which aims 'to increase the availability, and promote the exchange, of information about ongoing randomised controlled trials worldwide,' has appointed a new advisory board to help it in its work.  Other than yours truly, the Board includes Ben Goldacre and Paul Wicks (PatientsLikeMe) among its members, and is drawing on international... Continue Reading →

Cancer patient experience survey results show variations in access to clinical trials and research

The results of the annual cancer patient experience survey are out today. For those of us committed to improving patient access to clinical trials and other research, this year's report is particularly interesting.  As far as I know, this is the first year that the survey asked patients whether taking part in research had been discussed... Continue Reading →

There is no point to the javelin

It has come to this.  The world's top tennis players rush their shots to beat an 11pm curfew.  Bruce and Sir Paul are turned-off mid-performance.  And they don't use real javelins in schools. Looking across the the athletics field at my sons' school sports day, I spied a clutch of children competing in the javelin.  Except this... Continue Reading →

PLoS ONE study – I’d go further: poor quality information undermines rights of clinical trial participants

On my recent visit to Newcastle, my afternoon was spent talking to, and answering questions from, the public about research.  Clinical trials featured heavily.  The most common theme was their frustration over the poor quality information given to trial participants before, during and after a trial had finished. The journal, PloS ONE, has today published a... Continue Reading →

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