Pens and PCs to the ready: 2014 Access to Understanding science writing competition is launched

One of my highlights of last year was judging the 'Access to Understanding' science writing competition.  And I didn't event win it! Well, the good news is that it's happening again and the 2014 competition was launched this morning.  The less good news perhaps - from the point of view of entrants anyway - is … Continue reading Pens and PCs to the ready: 2014 Access to Understanding science writing competition is launched

Notes from a ‘small island’ in health research…..otherwise known as INVOLVE

A small island has appeared off the coast of Pakistan following the tragic earthquake there last week.  The consensus of scientific opinion is that, before long, this island will disappear without trace.  In the meantime it is an interesting curiosity, attracting quite a gaggle of geologists and geographers. I wonder if that is how INVOLVE was … Continue reading Notes from a ‘small island’ in health research…..otherwise known as INVOLVE

We are in danger of running public involvement in health on Ryanair principles

Patient and public advocates in health and social care would make bloody good pilots. Year after year we ask them to help successfully land projects and initiatives in 'fuel critical' situations. They are having to carry more, and further. But for how much longer before someone has to declare a real fuel emergency? And a … Continue reading We are in danger of running public involvement in health on Ryanair principles

Evaluating the impact of public involvement in research – the #PiiAF tool: launch remarks

Fantastic to see so many people gathered in the room and in hyperspace for the launch of the Public Involvement Impact Assessment Framework (PiiAF).  You can view the prototype website here. A really important piece of work and here are my remarks from the start of the day without the jokes. Launch of the Public … Continue reading Evaluating the impact of public involvement in research – the #PiiAF tool: launch remarks

INVOLVE steps forward to change behaviours on plain English summaries of health research

I make no apology for being a little bit obsessed by plain English summaries of research this week.  Events have conspired to make it this way. So, what did NIHR do when faced late last year with rising concern among academics, researchers, patients and the public about the poor quality of lay summaries?  It commissioned … Continue reading INVOLVE steps forward to change behaviours on plain English summaries of health research

The lay summary is dead, long live the lay summary (#A2UComp)

'They can't write for toffee.' 'They' being scientists of course. But like most generalisations, this statement is utter tosh. You only had to be at the 'Access to Understanding' awards (#A2UComp) at the British Library on Monday night to realise that. The lay summaries that I and my fellow judges had been asked to review … Continue reading The lay summary is dead, long live the lay summary (#A2UComp)

Text of speech to INVOLVE 2012 – Public involvement in research: would you like that shaken or stirred?

Public involvement in research: would you like that shaken or stirred? So, ladies and gentlemen, there I was on Saturday afternoon, at the pictures, watching the new James Bond movie, ‘Skyfall.’  This was background research for today you understand; listening to Adele dolefully sing: ‘This is the end’ which is the opening line of the … Continue reading Text of speech to INVOLVE 2012 – Public involvement in research: would you like that shaken or stirred?

Friday musings about tsars, conferences and stratified medicines

Today I started to think about the forthcoming INVOLVE national conference.  More particularly, what I want to say to this important gathering in less than a month's time.  This will be my first conference since taking over as Chair in June 2011 and, since then of course, I have also taken on the new National … Continue reading Friday musings about tsars, conferences and stratified medicines

Caldicott 2 public evidence sessions

If you are looking for Olympics-mayhem avoidance strategies then what better than taking the opportunity to share your views on Information Governance. My good colleagues at INVOLVE have reminded me to remind you, that Caldicott's remaining public workshops will take place on 8 August in Birmingham and on 22 August in Oxford.  The one in Leeds today was … Continue reading Caldicott 2 public evidence sessions

Double whammy by INVOLVE: new resources on diversity and inclusion in public involvement, and impact on research conduct

INVOLVE has published two fabulous resources on some current hot topics in public involvement in research: Strategies for diversity and inclusion in public involvement – this is a supplement to our briefing notes for researchers Public involvement in research:impact on ethical aspects of research – this resource provides examples of the impact of public involvement in the … Continue reading Double whammy by INVOLVE: new resources on diversity and inclusion in public involvement, and impact on research conduct

Cable and Willetts take public dialogue on science out of cold storage

It was only this time last week that, as I mulled over ideas for this blog, I considered a post listing some interesting 'facts' about public engagement including the number of days since the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) had said anything about future policy initiatives in the area of science and society. I should not … Continue reading Cable and Willetts take public dialogue on science out of cold storage

It’s all in a name: a Citizens Innovation Fund

With the budget not too far away, it is that time of year when organisations up and down the country are putting last-minute submissions into HM Treasury. Give more money into this, lower tax here, or there, they say. Very few, if any, will call for this or that to be cut. And while some … Continue reading It’s all in a name: a Citizens Innovation Fund

Friday drivetime blog: regional accents in public and patient involvement

It is still very early days in my new role as the NIHR Director of Public Participation and Engagement but I have already received a number of invitations to visit and see some of the great initiatives happening up and down the country.  Keep them coming.  It is my intent to get 'out there' as … Continue reading Friday drivetime blog: regional accents in public and patient involvement

The duty falls on all of us to issue that wake-up call to the NHS about its research mission

Last week, medical research charities among others hailed a series of Government amendments made to the Health and Social Care Bill.  These place 'a strong duty across the Secretary of State, the NHS Commissioning Board and Clinical Commissioning Groups to promote research and the use of research evidence.' The amendments are in response to persistent lobbying; their … Continue reading The duty falls on all of us to issue that wake-up call to the NHS about its research mission

Share your experience of public involvement in research: INVOLVE 2012 Conference call for presentations

  Doing this remotely so apologies if this doesn't work/come out very well: INVOLVE 2012: Putting people first in research Conference call for presentations is now open Our eighth biennial INVOLVE conference will take place on 13th and 14th November 2012 at the East Midlands Conference Centre in Nottingham. The conference will bring together members of the public, service users, researchers, research … Continue reading Share your experience of public involvement in research: INVOLVE 2012 Conference call for presentations

Entitled to a title? Should we better recognise members of the public and patients involved in research?

Various reports today about the Secretary of State for Health, Andrew Lansley MP's, statement in response to a question today in the Commons that he is working to introduce an 'effective compliance regime' to ensure local NHS organisations implement NICE recommendations.  Those with children will no doubt empathise. I'm not sure that as a statement … Continue reading Entitled to a title? Should we better recognise members of the public and patients involved in research?