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It’s NIHR Friday: NHS Trust research activity stats published

You didn’t think I’d forget NIHR Friday did you?

So the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Networks Co-ordinating Centre (NIHR CRN CC), together with The Guardian online, has this week published its annual performance tables for research activity in each NHS Trust in England for 2012/13.

You can find the figures for your local NHS Trust here. For each Trust data is provided on the number of clinical research studies recruiting during the year, along with the overall number of patients recruited into all studies.  Comparative figures are provided for 2011/12 so you can see whether activity has increased or not where you live.

Overall the news is very good indeed.  More than 630,000 people were recruited into clinical research studies.  That’s a 7% increase on the year before.  During the year NIHR CRN supported more than 4,200 studies and that’s a 12% increase on 2011/12.  There are some nice, simple summary reports available through the NIHR CRN CC website here (look for the pdfs at the end of the page).

A good year then.  But it can get better.  Hence the importance of the ‘Ok to ask’ International Clinical Trials Day (ICTD) campaign this year.

This week I was fortunate to see the early feedback and results from the campaign (in fact some of them are in my Leeds presentation which I posted yesterday).  There is much to celebrate.  You can be sure we will be continuing with the theme and perhaps we need to join-up the performance stats and the ‘Ok to ask’ activity in some way?  How about a ‘Rapid Reaction Ok to Ask’ taskforce to focus on the areas where we need to do most work?

Have a good weekend.

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Survey raises questions over NHS research

So it was an early start for me today, doing radio interviews for International Clinical Trials Day today.  I’ll post the links to one or two when available.  Here’s the press release from NIHR CRN which was the news peg for the interviews.

NEWS RELEASE TEXT (HEADLINE AS ABOVE)

The results of a new survey, published on International Clinical Trials Day (21 May), have shown that most people are not aware that research is a core part of the work of the NHS.  The survey raises concerns that patients could be missing out on opportunities to take part in potentially beneficial clinical trials as a result.

Research studies are the way that healthcare professionals gather robust evidence about what  works best, in order to improve treatments for patients now and for the future. 

The NHS Constitution states that the NHS will do all it can to ensure that patients are made aware of research opportunities relevant to them.  However, a new survey (conducted by One Poll on behalf of the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network) has found that:

Only 21 per cent of people surveyed were aware that carrying out research is a key activity for the NHS, yet…

82 per cent of people surveyed said it is important for the NHS to offer opportunities to take part in healthcare research

Less than seven per cent of people surveyed said they would never take part in a clinical research study.

These figures on consumer attitudes are in stark contrast to an earlier survey of healthcare professionals, carried out by Health Service Journal magazine last year, again on behalf of the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network.  In this survey, 61 per cent of healthcare respondents said that research was peripheral in their NHS Trust, with only 38 per cent agreeing that research is embedded in planning and performance at board level.

Commenting on the findings, Dr Jonathan Sheffield, chief executive of the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network, said:

“Research is core business for the NHS, so we need to encourage patients to be more demanding of their doctors and NHS institutions when it comes to offering the chance to take part in research activity.  We also need to do everything we can to encourage a research culture at all levels in the NHS. It is high time that NHS Trust boards put research on their radar.”

Whilst the surveys show that more work is required to build the profile of research activity in the NHS, there has been significant progress in recent years.  The National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network recruited more than half a million NHS patient volunteers into research studies last year, and this number continues to increase.

The organisation is also sponsoring an award for NHS Trusts who have made the most progress in embracing research at an institutional level.  

Dr Jonathan Sheffield said: “Research is not just an activity for the big teaching hospitals.  We need district hospitals and GP surgeries to rise to the challenge.  Many have already started to do so, but it’s important that it keeps progressing.  With an ageing population, the demands on our health service just continue to grow.  Research is the best way we have to work out the most effective and efficient ways to meet patients needs.  We need to take note of this survey, and keep pushing for research to have the profile it deserves with doctors and their patients.”

 ENDS

 

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